Artist Statement

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„I wanted to break out of ‘the grey’ with my colours.”
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Biography

Noémi Szabó, a Hungarian-born artist started life in a small industrial town in East-Central Europe in 1984. Her talent became evident as early as kindergarten when her colours in her drawings amazed her teachers.

She just learnt to walk when she grabbed some coloured pencils and crayons. She was able to reflect the world surrounding her via the means of drawing at a very early age. This itching desire to explore and express remained with her after having reached adulthood and it became clear that she is bound to take the direction of visual creative arts in her studies and life. At university – though she flirted with graphic design for a little while – she chose painting mainly due to her love for colours.

After studying in various art schools, she received a Master of Arts degree in Painting from the Hungarian Academy of Fine Arts in Budapest in 2008, where she graduated as a Visual Communication Teacher as well. Since 1998, her paintings have been displayed in numerous exhibitions in Hungary and in the last few years in other European cities (London, Munich and Mainz). Noémi’s artworks can be found in several Hungarian and foreign private collections in Spain, the Cayman Islands and the United States.

Experiments with different materials, with the powerfully composed fragmented world of shapes and the strong juxtaposition of colours play a determinative role during the process of creation. This was noticeable already at the early stages of her career. She uses mixed techniques in order to find balance by merging them: oil, acrylic and watercolour, texture material or airbrush technique, canvas and wood and she sometimes cuts and burns into the fibres. She often divides her paintings: one picture is a compound of two or more pieces. She may even sacrifice her figures occasionally by painting only parts of them to shape a unique composition. This fragmentation can be interpreted by the assistance of the viewer in order to finally put the work together into a whole. She expects the reverse effect to work in the viewers and she attempts to filter their recognition and their uniqueness through general history.

The harsh compositions of her paintings are combined with sophisticated stories. Since her university years the research of the body of complex symbols and gestures have become her favourite means of expression and the featured motif of her individual faceless body images. In this faceless world she is looking for a balance between the impersonal and the universal values of forms to communicate unconscious behaviours and attitudes. She is working on issues related to each body gesture: how to illustrate feelings and desires, such as a complex symbol of the face visualizing emotions and human relationships.

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Mission

“There are perfumes as cool as the flesh of children, / Sweet as oboes, green as meadows /— And others are corrupt, and rich, triumphant, / With power to expand into infinity, / Like amber and incense, musk, benzoin, / That sing the ecstasy of the soul and senses.” /Details of Correspondences, Charles Baudelaire – Translated by William Aggeler, The Flowers of Evil, 1954/ – She found the essence of her art in Baudelaire’s words, which defines her process of making the artwork and her existence in the world.

In her paintings she is concerned with the themes of emotions and repressed desires expressed through body movements, with general human situations, relations and the illustrations of various roles just as well as the face as the carrier and projector of complex symbols, which is unique in all people and comprise never-recurring features.

She would like to call attention to general social problems and different roles through her paintings. She believes in the capacity of change which can be achieved through connecting with yourself and others. „Our responsibility is to help through creativity. This process could be followed in the best way through children’s development. Our desires are glowing bubbles since our childhood. As grown-ups we usually forget about them and they burst before they could fly to us. When the viewer is looking at my work they soon find out and realize that my world that filters through the artwork becomes the viewer’s world as well. By this process a world that may have disappeared or become worn over time will be vivified. Feelings and desires which have long been forgotten, or perhaps seemed inaccessible may become apparent in this way.”

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